GRIEF

The first death I remember grieving was a hamster. My parents supported me as I led a solemn processional to a pre-dug gravesite, a shoebox/coffin in my hand. I performed a brief eulogy, prayed, and buried my first pet.

Other deaths would follow. My best friend died in a freak bicycle accident when we were 11 years old. Relatives would die, grandparents, an aunt, and other friends who left this life too early. I would grieve all of these deaths differently. But grief is cumulative – the more of it you experience, the heavier the burden becomes.

I’ve studied grief and death a great deal. Partly because of my fascination with the topics but also in order to do some healing of my own.

We grieve a great many things, not only death. For instance, my left arm was amputated when I was 13 years old because of bone cancer. Did I die? No. Did I grieve the loss of my arm? You bet I did! We might grieve the loss of a job. There is often a great deal of grief surrounding a divorce. The loss of an animal companion can result in excruciating grief for many. People who stop drinking or using drugs often grieve. The list goes on…

I have been trained in an evidenced based, educational, action oriented method to help people hurt less from the pain of grief. I’m not sure that we really “get over” someone or something we grieve. However, we can move forward, even from debilitating grief, by doing a few key things.

I offer this program in a seven or eight week format. And I’m not going to lie to you, grief work is hard, it is emotional, and I will likely ask you to go places you’d prefer not to go with your emotions. You may even dislike me for a portion of the program. But if you trust, and are completely honest, there is a way to come out from under the fog of grief.

Please Note: This program is NOT intended to be used as a crisis intervention. If you are feeling suicidal please call the National Suicide Hotline at 800-273-8255 or your local 911 services.

Interested? Let’s Talk!

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